Cyber Security Tips

To make you update of Cyber World

CyberfortTM Technologies (CFT) was established to strengthen the weakest point of any security solution: humans. No matter how effective—or expensive—the security tools protecting your network are, there’s no way to predict the damage caused by a single careless user. The war against cyber criminals is fought each time a user decides to click an unfamiliar link or open an attachment—and just a single mistake could be the reason for massive data loss.


GENERAL TIPS


Set secure passwords and don’t share them with anyone. Avoid using common words, phrases, or personal information and update regularly. Realize that you are an attractive target to hackers. Don’t ever say “It won’t happen to me.” Practice good password management. Use a strong mix of characters, and don’t use the same password for multiple sites. Don’t share your password with others, don’t write it down, and definitely don’t write it on a post-it note attached to your monitor.

Never leave your devices unattended. If you need to leave your computer, phone, or tablet for any length of time—no matter how short—lock it up so no one can use it while you’re gone. If you keep sensitive information on a flash drive or external hard drive, make sure to lock it up as well.

Keep your operating system, browser, anti-virus and other critical software up to date. Security updates and patches are available for free from major companies.

Verify the authenticity of requests from companies or individuals by contacting them directly. If you are being asked to provide personal information via email, you can independently contact the company directly to verify this request.

Pay close attention to website URLs. Pay attention to the URLs of websites you visit. Malicious websites sometimes use a variation in common spelling or a different domain (for example, .com instead of .net) to deceive unsuspecting computer users.

Offline, be wary of social engineering, where someone attempts to gain information from you through manipulation. If someone calls or emails you asking for sensitive information, it’s okay to say no. You can always call the company directly to verify credentials before giving out any information.

Back up your data regularly, and make sure your anti-virus software is always up to date.

Be conscientious of what you plug in to your computer. Malware can be spread through infected flash drives, external hard drives, and even smartphones.

Sensitive browsing, such as banking or shopping, should only be done on a device that belongs to you, on a network that you trust. Whether it’s a friend’s phone, a public computer, or a cafe’s free WiFi—your data could be copied or stolen.

Be sure to monitor your accounts for any suspicious activity. If you see something unfamiliar, it could be a sign that you’ve been compromised.

Intranet Security Testing

While outside threats must be guarded against, business must also protect against potential threats from within their own networks. Using many of the same techniques and procedures for Internet Security Testing, CyberfortTM Technologies (CFT) Consulting provides Intranet risk assessment and analysis to protect against the potential threat posed by insiders.

Depending on the client’s needs, intranet testing can be performed by CyberfortTM Technologies (CFT) Consulting under varying degrees of disclosure of network information from the client, for example with or without network accounts.

Email
  • Turn off the option to automatically download attachments.
  • Always be careful when clicking on attachments or links in email. If it’s unexpected or suspicious for any reason, don’t click on it. Double check the URL of the website the link takes you to: bad actors will often take advantage of spelling mistakes to direct you to a harmful domain.
  • Save and scan any attachments before opening them. If you have to open an attachment before you can verify the source, take the following steps:
    • Be sure your anti-virus software is up to date.
    • Save the file to your computer or a disk.
    • Run an anti-virus scan using your computer’s software.
Mobile
  • Only access the Internet over a secure network. Maintain the same vigilance you would on your computer with your mobile device.
  • Be suspicious of unknown links or requests sent through email or text message. Do not click on unknown links or answer strange questions sent to your mobile device, regardless of who the sender appears to be.
  • Download only trusted applications from reputable sources or marketplaces.
At Home
  • Talk to your children about Internet safety. Keep your family’s computer in an open area and talk to your children about what they are doing online, including who they’re talking to and what websites they’re visiting.
  • Inform children of online risks. Discuss appropriate Internet behavior that is suitable for the child’s age, knowledge, and maturity. Talk to children about the dangers and risks of the Internet so that they are able to recognize suspicious activity and secure their personal information.
Social Media & Chat Sites
  • Watch what you’re sharing on social networks. Criminals can befriend you and easily gain access to a shocking amount of information—where you go to school, where you work, when you’re on vacation—that could help them gain access to more valuable data.
  • Limit the amount of personal information you post. Do not post information that would make you vulnerable, such as your address or information about your schedule or routine. If your friend posts information about you, make sure the information is something that you are comfortable sharing with strangers.
  • Take advantage of privacy and security settings. Use site settings to limit the information you share with the general public online.
  • Be wary of strangers and cautious of potentially misleading or false information.
  • Be cautious about offers online – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.
At Work
  • Restrict access and secure the personal information of employees and customers to prevent identity theft.
  • Be suspicious of unsolicited contact from individuals seeking internal organizational data or personal information. Verify a request’s authenticity by contacting the requesting entity or company directly.
  • Immediately report any suspect data or security breaches to your supervisor and/or authorities.